One Thing That Successful Engineers Do: They Go Out of Their Comfort Zones

Too scared to take the leap? All right. Stay right where you are. And remain stuck there.


Lots of things about being an engineer are terrifying, especially the first times. The first time you need to visit and check the site activities. The first time to give commands to your subordinates or workers. The first time you have to make a presentation in front of the big bosses and the rest of your workmates. The first time you write and submit a status report of the project.

All of these are required from you professionally – with a lot more when you take a step in your work ladder – but these things personally scare the hell out of you. You want to avoid, but there is no other choice or else you will be taken out of the job.

It is understandable to feel that you like to stay within the convenience of your work habits. But do realize that those new and special tasks might be unpleasant to you, they are still necessary. Fear of trying new things has no room at the workplace – your comfort zone is meant to be evaded and disturbed for you to step out of it when you are an engineer.

Reality requires us to have that skill and courage to take the leap, because that is where our professional growth soars the most.

They say that life begins at the end of your comfort zone. That’s true. Because you are taken away from the ease of your regular activities, you are bound to learn the new by simply trying to do them. It can get uncomfortable, but that’s part of the step. Along the process you may stumble, but such is inevitable – perhaps even essential. It eventually bears fruit as the situations require our behaviors to adapt.

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Regardless if challenges in front of you are big or small, taking the plunge is the only way to do it. Escaping it will not make the task or problem to disappear, more so be accomplished. Always overcome your fear of failure because that will always stop you from doing what you are supposed to do. Rather, take it as a feeling of excitement that you will be an improved engineer after that experience.

You might feel powerless at moments outside your comfort zone, but remember that it will give you so much power later on from the experience – that you can already control that situation because you finally know what it is like.

Every opportunity of growth and learning as engineering must be sought, and most of the time, you can only do that if you step out of your comfort zone.

Dion Greg Reyes
A young civil engineer finding his place in the industry. Pilipino.

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  1. This article could be written using almost any occupation. Why is it that the author feels the need to focus on engineers? If anything, most engineers I have worked with over my career have demonstrated growth of experience and knowledge. Perhaps that’s not the same everywhere, but to post a ‘click-bait’ article based on the limited experience of a 23-year old engineer seems insulting to the majority of hard-working, experienced and creative engineers that make up the industry. If the intent was to target young, inexperienced engineers, then the article failed miserably. I would rather read an article that tackles the subject of engineers balancing the fine line between taking on new challenges and working within their area of knowledge. It’s when engineers veer too far outside their expertise that terrible things can happen.

One Thing That Successful Engineers Do: They Go Out of Their Comfort Zones

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