Why Engineers Need To Stop Saying “I’ll Try”

Change it to “I Will” instead.


The sentence “I’ll try.” is a statement that is often part of our vocabulary, especially at work. When it is used in the wrong context, it can hinder you from your goals and may also rub people the wrong way. We often use this sentence when we are suggested or asked to do a certain task, and we say “I’ll try” either because we don’t want to do the task and don’t want to hurt the other person’s feelings, or because we know ourselves that we might not be able to do it.

This statement, in that specific context limits you without you even noticing it.

“I’ll try to finish that report tomorrow”

“I’ll try to catch up with you at noon”

“I’ll see if I can make it in time for the meeting”

Sometimes, when you say it too much, people can translate your “I’ll try.” into: I heard your request but it’s not really a priority right now, but I can’t be honest enough to tell it to your face.

When they hear this, they know the truth and see right through you. It shows that you have lack of commitment, and soon your colleagues might not trust you anymore.

By using “try”, it indicates what you are actually thinking or what you don’t want to admit. When this becomes a habitual part of your vocabulary unconsciously, it will affect your mood and how you respond to things.

Source: quotefancy

“Try” can create doubt and the message you’re putting out is that it’s unlikely that you’ll succeed. So, instead of saying “I’ll try”, replace it with “I will”.

“I’ll finish that report tomorrow”

“I will catch up with you at noon”

“I will make it in time for the meeting”

If by any chance you really can’t say yes to a request, saying “no” directly is better that giving them false hope and saying “i’ll try”.

Try to eliminate “try” from your vocabulary and see how you and your environment changes. Just like what Master Yoda from Star Wars said:

“Do. or Do not. There is no try.”

Source: Earnestassoc

 

Read more  Things You’ll Never Hear a Successful Engineer Say

Article Source:

Inc

 

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Why Engineers Need To Stop Saying “I’ll Try”

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